Linkspam on a Saturday morning

Aug. 19th, 2017 09:00 am
cofax7: Marion Ravenwood in a hat (IJ - Marion hat)
[personal profile] cofax7
What a week, huh? So exhausting. I swear, this regime is going to ruin my liver.

Remember that guy at Google with the memo? (Seems like months ago, doesn't it?) Well, one of the MetaFilter gang decided to do a comprehensive discussion/analysis of his arguments, complete with citations. The Truth Has Got Its Boots On, which is a lovely Pratchett reference.

Here's a resource for people confused about the Trump/Russia scandal. Amidst all the racism and Nazis, there are still questions about Trump's history with Russia.

This New Yorker article also asks some questions about Wall Street Raider Carl Icahn and his relationship with the Trump regime. Conflicts of interest? Pish.

This article looks at environmental justice from the perspective of the community rather than the regulator or government. It's both devastating and hopeful.

This article from Pro Publica gives a solid historical overview of attempts to incorporate principles of environmental justice at the federal level, and how they have failed. I do love Pro Publica: they do solid investigative journalism.

Politics can make strange bedfellows, as we know: hunters are on the front lines protecting the public lands.

This Lawfare article about private military groups hints at some legal tools that can be used against the Neo-Nazis.

The New York Review of Books has dropped the paywall on James M. McPherson's take-down of the myth of the Lost Cause.

Here's a blackly funny report of a call to a Georgia Congressman's office.

*

Alton Brown's fruitcake recipe. It looks tasty, but the volume is far too small. Why make only one fruitcake at a time?!

*

I am working on my NFE story, but argh, just realized that book club is this coming Wednesday, and I haven't read the book yet! Argh. Also it took me 4 tries to get started on the story, and then I had to do some background research and realized that I had [redacted] wrong, and also [redacted], and now I have to research [redacted]. I'm not sure if I'm going to get done in time...

*

In other news, Help!. Is anyone else using Chrome and having trouble logging into DW? I turned off HTTPS Everywhere, but that didn't make any difference. I simply cannot log in.

And now off to dog class where once again we will fail on the weave poles...
katikat: (F_Inception)
[personal profile] katikat
The visuals in this film are amazing. I saw it in the cinema and it's still as fantastic on DVD: the cars, the fights, the chases, the desert... Wow. But what really made this movie for me was the growing friendship between Max and Furiosa. At first they didn't care about each other, then they hated each other and in the end, they became amazing friends. That was just lovely... *happy sigh*
rivkat: Dean reading (dean reading)
[personal profile] rivkat
Robert H. Lustig, The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and BrainsRead more... )

Richard S. Dunn, A Tale of Two Plantations: Slave Life and Labor in Jamaica and VirginiaRead more... )

Spectre Requisitions

Aug. 18th, 2017 05:05 pm
settiai: (FemShep -- paperpinafore)
[personal profile] settiai
There's an exchange called Spectre Requisitions, which is for rarer 'ships in the Mass Effect fandom. It's a lot of fun, and I've participated in it the last two years.

Anyway, I seriously lucked out on my gifts this year, so I need to flail about them a little. I know that I have some Mass Effect fans over here on DW, so maybe some of you will of interest.

First, for a treat, I received a lovely piece of artwork. ♥ I absolutely adore F!Shepard/Garrus/Tali (to the point that 15% of the works on the AO3 about that relationship are fics by me), so I was absolutely thrilled to get the notification for that.

But my actual gift really wins everything. Because someone wrote me 22k words of Ashley/F!Shepard/Kaidan, based on a prompt that I've included in various exchanges for something like three or four years now. It's amazing, and you should totally go read it if you're even remotely intrigued by the idea of that relationship.
[syndicated profile] dinosaur_comics_feed
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August 18th, 2017next

August 18th, 2017: This week I have been at a delightful cottage and it has been delightful! I recommend: delightful cottages. Thank you for your time and attention.

– Ryan

SSHG Giftfest

Aug. 18th, 2017 05:52 pm
kerravonsen: Snape, Hermione: "Believe" (Snape-Hermione)
[personal profile] kerravonsen
It has come around again.

2017 banner 1


I'm torn about whether I will sign up or not.

I made two works for the [livejournal.com profile] sshg_promptfest, and put them up on my Etsy store, thinking that at least somebody in the fest would give them a good home... and not a whisper. I think it was even more deeply discouraging because there were folks who commented on my fest entries (before the reveal) that they wanted them... but obviously didn't want them enough to buy them when I pointed out (after the reveal) that they could...

This is deeply frustrating, because I find it really fulfilling to make wearable art, but since I've run out of friends to give my SS/HG works to (they have said that they now have too much to wear...) then the only other way to give them a good home is to sell them; to sell them at a price that actually reflects what they are worth. But if nobody will buy them, then what is the point of making them, if they won't be worn by anybody?

(sigh)

Hence, I am torn.

the vid I made for vividcon this year

Aug. 17th, 2017 10:15 pm
jmtorres: (physics)
[personal profile] jmtorres
This was in Club Vivid, and it is very silly.

vid: UFO
vidder: [personal profile] jmtorres
fandom: Home, AKA The True Meaning of Smek Day, the Movie
song: UFO Has Landed In the Ghetto by Ry Cooder
format: mp4, 39MB
runtime: 2:32
link: on Google Drive. I'm trying a new thing for where to keep my vids. Let me know if you have technical issues downloading it, please!
warnings: I can't think of any, there's a couple of explosions but it's an animated kids movie, they're not exactly graphic.

(no subject)

Aug. 17th, 2017 07:23 pm
resonant: Brian from The Breakfast Club: Demented and sad, but social (Default)
[personal profile] resonant
The news is apocalyptically awful, of course. But I'm a Southerner, and I never expected that I would live to see those statues come down. It was something I didn't even dare to hope for.

I don't want to lose sight of how amazing that is.

deep breaths, baby girl

Aug. 17th, 2017 12:13 pm
cypher: (home is where the haunt is)
[personal profile] cypher
First, [community profile] raremaleslashex reveals happened earlier this week! I wrote two things for it:

With His Need Laid Bare (nsfw), Fire Emblem Fates, Leo/Niles kidnapping roleplay. My recipient had a very open-ended signup, so I figured I would write a story that had themes that were fun for me to work on, and that seemed to go pretty well.

Eyes in the Dark (not explicit), The Magnus Archives, Jonathan Sims/Gerard Kaey. I love the mysterious feel of this canon and the strong sense of voice we get for the characters (as well we should, given the medium!) and Gerard is such a fascinating enigma. So I wrote something in the style of the canon's first-person statements about supernatural encounters. No spoilers for the series, though it's definitely inspired heavily by Episode 12, "First Aid."

Second, I'm dithering over signing up for [community profile] femslashex -- I'm fairly sure I do want to sign up, but I have eight fandoms in mind and only six request slots, so I'm hesitating. I thiiiink I'm leaning toward using the final slot for Devil Survivor 2; all the options I have in mind are long shots, but I think that's the one I have the most unsatisfied feelings about. Girls surviving the demon apocalypse together, man. It's a thing.

Third: it's really rare for me to watch live action TV but the household has consumed the first four episodes of Wynonna Earp recently and I love it. It's not Quality Entertainment by any discerning measure but it's so much fun, this paranormal romp made of violence and sass, and the actors are having a good time and playing off each other really enjoyably. Dolls is my fave, I think, but the competition is fierce. (Please don't spoil me for future episodes; I've done pretty well at not learning what's up with these characters and I want to find out through watching.)

ETA Fourth, I forgot earlier: I've been playing Fate/Grand Order since it released in NA and I'm having a lot of fun with it, ridiculous history and all. My user ID is 161,219,808 if any of you are playing and would like to add me. I just equipped the Moonlight Festival CE on my Archer Support for grinding purposes.

What are you doing for fun these days?

Just doing some RPG organization

Aug. 17th, 2017 11:45 am
wildefae: (Default)
[personal profile] wildefae
[ETA: Not AS bad as I was thinking, though most of these aren't actually at rec-length, so I'm just posting a list of threads to keep myself on track.]

thread tracker August 2017 )
rivkat: Dean reading (dean reading)
[personal profile] rivkat
Either my internet access is really bad or something is wrong with DW; either way, apologies for the lack of cuts.

Ron Formisano, American Oligarchy: The Permanent Political Class: This cri de coeur about corruption has a lot of outrage, but it’s short on definitions and thus on solutions. At times, Formisano suggests that anyone with a state, local, or federal government job is part of the oligarchy, as well as doctors, people in positions of authority at nonprofits, think tanks, and businesses. There is a lot of corruption in the US; the chapter about the abuses in Kentucky, where poverty, pollution, child mortality, and other indicators of suffering are extremely high, should make anyone angry. I understand getting mad at nonprofit CEOs who are compensated like for-profit CEOs—but the problem is not the parity (I don’t like the argument that “you chose a helping profession, you should accept less pay because of how good it feels to do good”; not only is it a trope usually used to justify paying female-dominated professions less, it positions doing good as something you ought to have to pay for, when really you ought to have to pay for acting solely in your own self-interest) but the fact that anybody can get paid as much as for-profit CEOs do, with so little tax. It is appalling that CEOs of nonprofit hospitals are paid hundreds of millions while the hospitals garnish the wages of poor patients who can’t pay—but that is true of for-profit hospitals too.

Formisano also points out that our federal legislators get perks that let them live like millionaires even when (as is increasingly unlikely) they aren’t; during the 2013 government shutdown, Congresspeople stopped National Airport from closing because it served them and also deemed their own gyms and pools “essential” enough to stay open, though the workers there still didn’t make very much. These privileges, he suggests, corrupt even the people who moved up in class, so that a visionary leader at Brown University speaks eloquently about admitting more students from poor backgrounds but also doesn’t want to interfere with alumni preferences because she has a granddaughter. The elites funnel money to themselves and their families by self-dealing, whether in government (remember Kim Davis?), nonprofits, or business. Disgrace, if exposure occurs, is ameliorated by a soft landing—a pension, positions on other boards, and soft words from one’s co-elites. Even nonprofits are in on the game, and they increasingly replace grassroots activism with palatable-to-elites causes that are organized from the top.

Formisano quotes Robert Borosage’s criticism of liberal focus on “opportunity” instead of equity or punishment for elite cheaters as “passive voice populism,” to good effect. Defunding tax collection is just another mechanism of harm—creating more loopholes for cheaters, who are subsidized by ordinary wage workers whose taxes are collected automatically. Though it’s relatively easy to cherry-pick from history, this John Adams quote seemed apposite: “civil, military, political and hierarchical Despotism, have all grown out of the natural Aristocracy of ‘Virtue and Talents.’ We, to be sure, are far remote from this. Many hundred years must roll away before We shall be corrupted.”

James Q. Whitman, Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law: Repeatedly, Nazis looking for inspiration looked to the US system of racial discrimination, primarily in the treatment of immigration, the rights of those in non-state territories, and anti-miscegnation laws. Whitman emphasizes that the Nazis’ crimes were their own and that they also rejected liberal and democratic parts of American law. They also appealled to racist practices among other European colonial powers. Still, Whitman argues that, because the Nazis didn’t envision the Holocaust when they started out, they found compelling analogies in American discriminatory practices, even though these practices were often not aimed at Jews. As with everything about America, it was possible to be selective, and the Nazis had no problem claiming that New York City had “very little to do with ‘America’” because of all its race-mixing and Jews.

Hitler was able to see the US as a model of Nordic supremacy, and he wasn’t alone; a Nazi historian described the Founding, in what Whitman says was the received wistom of the time, as “a historic turning point in ‘the Aryan struggle for world domination.’” One detailed scholarly work, Race Law in the United States, had as heroes Jefferson and Lincoln—Jefferson because of his insistence that blacks and whites couldn’t live under the same government if both were free, and Lincoln because of his early calls for black resettlement outside the US. Similarly, “Nazi expansion eastward was accompanied by invocations of the American conquest of the West, with its accompanying wars on Native Americans…. Indeed as early as 1928 Hitler was speechifying admiringly about the way Americans had ‘gunned down the millions of Redskins to a few hundred thousand, and now keep the modest remnant under observation in a cage’ ….”

Jim Crow segregation, Whitman contends, wasn’t all that important to the Nazis, but citizenship and sex/reproduction were, and it was there that they took lessons from the US. In fact, “Nazis almost never mentioned the American treatment of blacks without also mentioning the American treatment of other groups, in particular Asians and Native Americans.” American immigration and naturalization law was, almost uniquely, racist and race-based, and Hitler praised it for being so in Mein Kampf. And there were various forms of de jure and de facto second-class citizenship for African-Americans, Filipinos, and Chinese, to which the Nazis could look as they created second-class citizenship for Jews—drawing on, for example, the distinction between “political rights” and “civil rights” that American whites offered to excuse segregation. Indeed, some Nazis considered openly race-based laws to be more honest about keeping “alien races” from getting the upper hand; they had no need for grandfather clauses, and they devised the Nuremberg Laws in part to “institute official state persecution in order to displace street-level lynchings,” which offended the facist need for state centralization.

The US was also unique in anti-miscegnation laws, with careful rules about blood quantum—in fact, there were no other models for such laws for the Nazis to consult. And it mattered, Whitman suggests, that America was seen as a dynamic country—confirmation for the Nazis that the future was going in their direction. Among other things, American creativity on the definition of race showed that one didn’t need a purely scientific or theoretical definition of race, despite the leanings of German law; one could proceed with a political, pragmatic definition in enforcing anti-miscegenation and other discriminatory laws. Indeed, that’s ultimately what the Germans did when they defined Jews as including people with one Jewish parent if and only if they practiced Judaism or married Jews (rejecting, along the way, the even more aggressive American one-drop rule). Whitman concludes that we have to acknowledge that the Nazis practiced a particular kind of Legal Realism, whereby the law was supposed to assist in the process of social transformation, throwing formalism aside and recognizing reality—and reality, in both countries, was racist. “[T]o have a common-law system like that of America is to have a system in which the traditions of the law do indeed have little power to ride herd on the demands of the politicians, and when the politics is bad, the law can be very bad indeed.” Whitman finds the most prominent modern manifestation of this in the US in its harsh criminal justice system.

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